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Be Accurate And Enthusiastic In Your
Voice Over Demo Cover Letters
June 14, 2017

By Rick Lance

Voice Actor

There will be many times when you will be required to submit a voice over demo and cover letter - by email or snail mail - to a prospective client, agent, producer or employer. 

Cover letters are challenging to write because most of us do not like writing about ourselves.  It is uncomfortable, not just for voice over artists, but for most human beings. 

Nevertheless, it is a necessary evil, so it is best to just get past the discomfort in order to sell yourself in the best possible light.

DON'T RUSH IT

Whether you are just updating a previously written cover letter or writing an entirely new one, do not rush yourself. 

Take your time, so you are less likely to make costly mistakes. Typos can really turn prospective agents and employers off. Worse yet, there have been occasions when people have left the wrong employer's name in a cover letter, or mis-typed a phone number. 

Take your time and avoid missed opportunities.

MAKE IT PERSONAL

People respond better to personalized messages. Rather than writing a "Dear Sir or Madam" letter, take the time to track down the name of the person who will be reading your cover letter.

In addition to learning the name of the agent or casting director, learn more about the agency or the employer. Know what sort of work they do, what industries they serve, and more, so you can appropriately reference these facts and make things as personalized as possible.

SHOW YOUR ENTHUSIASM


Are you excited about the potential job or connection? Then make that abundantly clear! 

You won't sound desperate. You will sound enthusiastic, and that's a very winning quality. People want to hire voice over talents who want to show up to work each day.

Above all else, write in your own voice and don't be shy to explain why you think you are a great candidate for the job.

Part of working in voice over is being able to sell yourself. So, sell away!
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ABOUT RICK
Rick Lance has been working as a voice talent since 1993, transitioning from singing demos and personal projects in Nashville's music business to voicing hundreds of commercials, then promos, narrations, character voices and more. His vocal style is described as Americana, the voice of the Heartland. He is currently the voice (narrator) of three hunting programs and one outdoor program on the Sportsman Channel and the Outdoor Channel. His client list includes Toyota, Harley Davidson, Sony Entertainment, Coca Cola, Life Care Centers of America, John Deere, Jordan Outdoor Enterprises and Sacred Seasons II. He has also become a leading voice for the industries of construction, manufacturing, energy production, trucking, agriculture/equine, outdoor sports, travel, community banking, finance and health care. And he is a colorful voice for film, television, museum and corporate documentaries. "I'm lucky to be working within my comfort zone," he says, "literally living out my voice acting life as an outdoorsman, horseman, weekend cowboy and working man, gentleman farmer on my six acre mini ranch with my horses, dogs, cats and my wife near Nashville."

Web: www.ricklancestudio.com

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